We offer expertise in many areas including clinical trials, survival analysis, longitudinal data, statistical genetics and image data analysis.

Our panel of statistical experts is comprised of twenty biostatisticians providing collaborative support with a wide range of specialty expertise — causal interference, clinical trials, genomics analysis, imaging, survey sampling, time-to-event data and many other foci.

Biostatistics Collaboration

We offer expertise in many areas including clinical trials, survival analysis, longitudinal data, statistical genetics and image data analysis.

Our panel of statistical experts is comprised of twenty biostatisticians providing collaborative support with a wide range of specialty expertise — causal interference, clinical trials, genomics analysis, imaging, survey sampling, time-to-event data and many other foci.

Biostatistics collaboration in biomedical research includes:

  • statistical consulting and collaborative services on design and analysis in planning proposed studies
  • assistance with protocol development and review
  • identification of appropriate statistical and machine learning techniques
  • questionnaire review and psychometric analysis
  • biostatistical input to manuscript preparation
  • power and sample size calculations and biostatistics input to grant preparation

For all biostatisitics collaborations, we strongly advise you to submit your request at least 3 weeks before any due date.

Point of Contact: John Preisser, PhD

Policy on student requests for Biostatistical Services (pdf)

Other resources

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Brinkhous-Bullitt, 2nd floor
160 N. Medical Drive
Chapel Hill, NC 27599

919.966.6022
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