The annual Biostatistics Seminar Series builds on topics covered in a typical sequence of introductory statistics courses, engage issues and themes that arise frequently in applied research collaborations between clinical and translational researchers and biostatistics.

Biostatistics Seminar Series: Fall 2022

We are pleased to again offer our TraCS Biostatistics Seminar Series in fall 2022.

The series comprises four webinars that build on topics covered in typical introductory statistics courses while highlighting issues and themes that often arise between clinical and translational researchers and consulting biostatisticians in applied research contexts. For details and to register, see below.

(Note: We also co-sponsor similar, additional training webinars via collaboration with our partner CTSA groups at Wake Forest and Duke. For details, visit biostat.duke.edu.)

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Upcoming Seminars


Past Seminars

For general information regarding our offerings, here is a list of sessions offered in fall 2021:

  • Power Analysis (Prof. Todd Schwartz, Sept. 3, 2021)
  • Exploring High-Dimensional Datasets: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Clustering (Dr. Jeff Laux, Oct. 1, 2021)
  • Causal inference with observational data: A gentle introduction (Prof. Michael Hudgens, Nov. 5, 2021)
  • Marginal models and mixed models for longitudinal outcomes: What's the difference? (Prof. Bajhat Qaqish, Dec. 3, 2021)
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Chapel Hill, NC 27599

919.966.6022
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